Researchers discovered why blood clots form in Covid-19 patients

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The finding determined that they are autoimmune antibodies that circulate in the blood, which attack cells and trigger clots in arteries, veins and microscopic vessels

A recent study by scientists from the universities of Michigan and Shanghai determined why blood clots form in patients with severe Covid-19 infection, which causes life-threatening conditions such as strokes and restricted blood flow in the lungs.

The finding determined that they are autoimmune antibodies that circulate in the blood, which attack cells and trigger clots in arteries, veins and microscopic vessels.

These antibodies are generally seen in people with an autoimmune disease called antiphospholipid syndrome, but they are also present in about half of severely COVID-19 patients.

“Half of the patients hospitalized for Covid-19 tested positive for at least one of the autoantibodies, which was a big surprise,” said Jason Knight, one of the researchers expert in diseases caused by autoantibodies to EurekAlert!

Likewise, the study found that approximately half of severely affected Covid-19 patients exhibited “a combination of high levels of dangerous antibodies and super-activated neutrophils, which are destructive and explosive white blood cells.” And it was in April that critically ill patients were first reported to have higher levels of extracellular neutrophil traps in their blood.

To find an answer, scientists investigated explosive neutrophils and Covid-19 antibodies by combining them in laboratory mice to see if it was the deadly combination that causes clots.

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“Antibodies from patients with active COVID-19 infection created a surprising amount of clotting in animals, one of the worst clots we have ever seen,” said study co-author Yogen Kanthi.

“We have discovered a new mechanism by which patients with covid-19 can develop blood clots,” he explained

Finally, the scientists announced that their discoveries could not yet be put into clinical practice, but they assured that they do provide a new perspective on thrombosis and inflammation in patients with Coronavirus.